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Explore the Frederick  Albert Sutton Building

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THE FREDERICK ALBERT SUTTON BUILDING

 

The Frederick Albert Sutton Building (FASB), dedicated 17 April, 2009, is the home of the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. FASB replaced the 1927 Mines Building; it was made possible through generous philanthropic support of many individuals and organizations.

The four-story, 91,000 square foot building features classrooms, laboratories, and offices that foster collaboration and innovative research. The building is distinctive in that its architectural design and educational display areas provide an interactive teaching environment and a magnificent showcase for discoveries in the fields of geology and geophysics.

Reverend Marta Sutton Weeks-Wulf provided the lead gift for the project in honor of her father, Frederick Albert Sutton.

Many gifts to the department not currently on display may rotate at different times to showcase the breadth of our collections.

The Frederick Albert Sutton Building

Virtual Tour of the Frederick Albert Sutton Building


REVEREND MARTA SUTTON WEEKS-WULF
& FREDERICK ALBERT SUTTON

Marta Sutton Weeks-Wulf
Frederick Albert Sutton



“Although my father’s name is on the building, to me, it stands for all field geologists, everywhere, who have had to work in and under very difficult circumstances. It is my hope that it will continue to enable groundbreaking educational and research opportunities for generations to come.”
- Rev. Marta Sutton Weeks-Wulf

PERSPECTIVE

Upon its completion in 2009, FASB was one of the first Earth science LEED-certified green buildings in the country. With museum-like geologic art displays, many friends and alumni hailed it as the most spectacular geology building in the country. This may sound rather unbelievable, but many who have seen it in person concur. Our own faculty, who have likely visited every major Earth science department in the world, agree that we have created a unique space to showcase our geologic art to inspire and excite students. This serves as an example of what can be done to further infuse Earth science into the community. 

As an outreach and recruiting tool, FASB can help attract the very best and brightest to venture into the field. It has also opened many opportunities for the Department to develop community partnerships that were not so easily available before. The building is routinely visited by campus and off-campus groups, University orientation tours, and more. Faculty and architect teams from other institutions come to visit and learn how they can incorporate similar successful elements into their own new or existing buildings. As a “beacon of excellence”, FASB is a prime example of what many other campus buildings want to emulate. 

Students having a barbeque in the rock gardens
Students working together

STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

“I came to be in the Geology building because my mom had recommended the coffee shop to me and that I should check out the new building. I had no idea at the time that it would become the building where I would meet the most inspirational faculty and create lifelong friends, but I certainly felt something when I entered the door that day. I indulged in my desire to stare in wonder at the metaconglomerate slabs and the early hominids. I thought to myself, I should take a Geology class.”

“I walked into the lobby of the Sutton Building and was blown away. Every university I had toured prior gave me the same talk about how their geology program was so well funded and supported, but the Sutton Building showed me that what I had been hearing from the U was more than just a sales pitch. I remember walking around the building with my mom and saying “Look! They have ichnites just hanging on the walls! I love ichnites!” The slabs of orthoceras, the Allosaurus skull, the wall of Green River fish, it was all stunning!”

“I was walking the halls of the Sutton building one night at work, making sure all the doors were secure as part of my job as campus security. I walked around the third floor and the displays inspired me in a way that only art can. I came to the conclusion that a career in the earth sciences would allow me to pursue my passions and to have a positive effect on the world. Life works in mysterious ways and though my academic journey has been longer than most, I can truly say that I’ve never been happier and more excited about my future. FASB, its architectural wonders, and amazing geological art pieces were instrumental in helping me reconnect with my inner self and discover the joy it is to be an Earth scientist.“

 


BUILDING AWARDS

2017 University of Utah – Beacon of Excellence Award for Transformative Undergraduate Experiences; the first building to receive this award as normally it is given to an individual 
2011 Design Utah – Environmental Design Award
2010 LEED certification (Gold level, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), U.S. Building Green Council
2009 People's Choice – Utah American Insitute of Architects, which the Salt lake Tribune newspaper; a field of 50 entries
2009 ACI (American Concrete Institute) Intermountain Chapter Excellence in Concrete Award
2008 Utah Association of General Contractors Building of the Year Award (Category: Higher Education 0-$25 million)
The Frederick Albert Sutton Building

LEED-CERTIFIED BUILDING

The Frederick Albert Sutton Building
A course in sustainability had students propose eco-friendly projects that were then incorporated into FASB’s construction. FASB became the first LEED-certified building on the U’s main campus. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction, and operation of high performance sustainable buildings. The building has reinforced concrete in the foundation and walls that minimizes vibrations, allowing researchers to make more accurate analytical measurements. Exposed concrete walls in the interior provide structural support against seismic ground motions. Stylized sedimentary “cross bedding” features formed in the concrete of the north and west exterior walls of the building herald a geological theme that continues throughout. 
  • General Contractor: Gramoll Construction
  • Building Architecture: Myron Richardson of Brixen-Christopher, with engineering by Cooper-Roberts-Simonsen and Associates
  • Decorative and Educational Displays: John and Lee Diamond of Diamond Phillips

 

Scoring levels for the rating of LEED-certified buildings include evaluation in 6 categories:

  • Sustainable sites
  • Water efficiency
  • Energy and atmosphere
  • Materials and resources
  • Indoor environmental quality
  • Innovation and design process

LEED certification plaque with Dean Frank Brown, U of U President Michael Young, and Dr. Marjorie Chan (2009).

LEED certification plaque with Dean Frank Brown, U of U President Michael Young, and Dr. Marjorie Chan (2009).


 

EVENTS AT FASB

FASB is often brimming with activity, including a weekly Distinguished Lecture Series, public building tours, K-12 fieldtrips, prospective student meet-and-greets, and a bi-annual public open house.

Children having a building tour of the FASB
Children playing with a sandbox at the FASB

PUBLIC OPEN HOUSES

The biggest events housed at FASB are the Department of Geology and Geophysics Open Houses. At each of these events, several hundred visitors, including K-12 students and their families, roam the halls while engaging in over three dozen different hands-on activities, including virtual reality, augmented reality, video gaming, licking salt, inspecting rocks and gems with microscopes, 3D images, drones, tours of the building, and so much more! The featured event is a keynote presentation given by one of the Department’s faculty members.

The evening’s activities are led by our enthusiastic students, staff, and faculty and includes participation by the Global Change and Sustainability Center and Seismograph Stations, as well as other departments within University of Utah and local community partners. 

Faculty and an inflatible dinosaur

 

EXPLORING OUR FLOORS

Large slab of rock
Students studying rock slab

One of the unique aspects of FASB is that it blurs the traditional boundaries between bricks and mortar and educational programs. There has never been a more important time to understand the planet Earth and the role of our science in society. 

Spectacular rock slabs displayed on all four floors tell about various Earth processes and come from around the world. All of FASB’s displays are carefully selected to teach specific geologic concepts. The building is “stratified” with its faculty in the subdisciplines of solid Earth (second floor), Earth history (third floor), and Earth’s surface (fourth floor). Many of the rock slabs were given by or acquired from Arizona Tile, Contempo Ceramic Tile, Daltile & Stone, European Marble & Granite, North Salt Lake Marble & Granite, Western Hills, The Stone Collection, Bedrosians, and State Stone. In addition, polished stone accent table tops, gifted by North Salt Lake Marble & Granite, are scattered throughout the building and tell additional geologic stories. 

Student staring at large rock slab

Countertop Geology: A new class, Countertop Geology, was designed to enchance our knowledge of the rock slabs commonly used for kitchen countertops. Student in the class study the slabs with petrographic microscopes and department analytical instrumentation.

Digital Database: A new digital database is being compiled to develop and aggregate teaching resources based on FASB’s displays. This is another innovation that will be a valuable resource to others who similarly want to use rock slabs as teaching tools. 


BUILDING MAP

Map of the FASB

 

EAST ENTRANCE/SECOND FLOOR

Landscaping at FASB’s east entrance is designed to merge with the Rock Garden in front of the adjoining William Browning Building. A dry-river cobble bed outside the east entrance, facing the Wasatch Mountain, extends inside the building as a sinuous stream of pebble tile. Encased in epoxy, the pebble stream moves westward toward the stairway where it, like the stairway, drops to the first floor. The pebble stream continues flowing westward toward the first floor entrance where, outside the building, it once again becomes a dry-river cobble bed and continues toward the Salt Lake Valley.

 

Rock GardenRock monoliths from Butterfield Gardens merge with
the Rock Garden on the east side of the William Browning Building.

Confluence Stream

The multicolored slate tiles are Precambrian (Neoproterzoic) from the Serra da Santa Helena Formation, Bambuí Group of the São Francisco Supergroup, Minas Gerais State, Brazil and are gifts from Daltile & Stone and Green Slate Mining. The river pebbles are from China, donated by Solistone, Inc.

Angled Rock slab

The angled rock slab just outside the east entrance is
garnet-staurolite-schist, a “quarried end piece” from
the Precambrian Espinhaco Supergroup, Piripá, Bahia, Brazil
and is a gift from Contempo Ceramic Tile.


SECOND FLOOR DISPLAYS & SLABS

Second floor map


PETER B. STIFEL CONFLUENCE

Green confluence

 


In keeping with the river theme, the second-story rotunda at the east entrance is named The Peter Stifel Confluence, in honor of the 1964 Ph.D. geology alumnus of the University of Utah. This confluence is where FASB joins the William Browning Building, home of the Departments of Metallurgical Engineering, Mining Engineering, and Atmospheric Sciences. 

A majestic aerial photograph of the confluence of the Green and Colorado Rivers in southern Utah, accompanied by a quote from the famed early explorer of the western U.S., John Wesley Powell, hangs near the stairway in The Peter Stifel Confluence. The photo was taken by geologist and professional photographer Michael Collier.

Entrance ceiling

A MOQUI MARBLE JOURNEY SCULPTURE

Moqui Marble Sculpture


This sculpture features Moqui “marbles” of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone from the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument that are embedded into Triassic Chinle Formation sandstone, known by the trade name “Kanab Goldenstone”. This rock highlights a few of the many sedimentary and fluid flow processes that are visible in southern Utah’s iconic landscape. The marbles were recovered by the Federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) during an investigation into illegal collection of these protected resources. BLM then released some marbles to the Department of Geology and Geophysics for educational use. The Goldenstone was acquired through collaboration with Ken Brown and Western Hills Rocks & Gems Inc., and the stone relief marbles were creatively embedded by Susan Judy of Stone Quilt Design. 


DONOR FISH WALL

 

The Peter B. Stifel Confluence is also home to a spectacular display of 104 Eocene age Green River fish fossils— some 50 million years old—from Fossil Lake near Kemmerer, Wyoming. The fish, including Knightia, Priscacara, Diplomystus, and Mioplosus, are arranged in a school. The edges of the display are framed in polished Green River “marlstone”, made of lime-stone and dolomite, which has been set on its edge to show laminations. Fine, organic-rich oil shale laminations provide the dark-colored stripes in the frame. 

The donor listing at center of the fish wall pays lasting tribute to the individuals and organizations whose generous gifts made the construction of FASB possible. 

 

Fish Wall

Architect John Diamond of Diamond Phillips designed the donor wall, fish display, and variation in stone colors.
The fish fossils, stone pieces, and edge frame treatments are from Green River Stone Company. 

Green River Formation Donor Wall

ANTIQUE PALEONTOLOGY LITHOGRAPH WALL CHARTS

Confluence Lounge Area

The large, framed teaching charts hanging throughout the second and third floors were produced by Karl Alfred Zittel (1839-1904) in the German volume “Palaeontologische Wandtafeln,” Druck und Verlag Theodor Fischer, Cassel (Printing and publisher Theodor Fischer, Cassel, 1879-1891). 

 

A large, handmade, Pakistan wool rug gifted by Adib’s Rug Gallery, and plants acquired from Cactus & Tropicals, add warmth to the Confluence area. Furniture from Henriksen-Butler.


PLANT WALL

Just around the corner from the Confluence is an equally spectacular display of carbonized leaf fossils, also from the Green River Formation and ancient Fossil Lake. Because plant fossils—particularly ones that are well-preserved enough for use in scientific research—are generally quite rare, the Plant Wall is one of the best displays in the country.

This remarkable collection of plant fossils come from the Ulrich fossil quarries near Kemmerer, Wyoming. Dr. Lonnie and Shannon Paulos generously donated this collection to the University of Utah. Other portions of his collection are housed within the Department of Geology and Geophysics and the Natural History Museum of Utah at the University of Utah.

Plant Wall Description
Plant Wall

OPEN DISPLAYS

Allosaurus fragilis

Life-size cast of an Allosaurus skull in aircraft stainless steel; a gift of Jeff Gentry with the assistance of Jim Madsen,
who provided the original plaster cast.

 

Allosaurus fragilis (above) is the Utah State Fossil and is a meat-eating dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation (ca. 150 million years ago). This specimen is from the Cleveland-Lloyd Quarry, in the newly designated Jurassic National Monument in Emery County, Utah. The quarry is an exceptional site for fossilized adult and juvenile samples. 

The Hominid Display highlights geochronology (age dating) of sedimentary deposits that has been important in establishing the evolutionary history of early man. This display reflects the research efforts of Dr. Francis H. Brown with students and collaborations in the Omo-Turkana Basin of Kenya and Ethiopia. 

Hominid Display

CANYONLANDS PAINTING

Canyonlands Painting

 


Hanging above the stairway, on the south wall, is “Confluence Sentinel,” a large oil painting commissioned from Utah artist John Collins (1987, B.F.A. U of U). His appreciation for the natural beauty of Utah is evident in the expressive palette he chose. 


FIRST FLOOR

Outside on the west side, a braided river sidewalk separates FASB and the parking structure with a façade of the Basin and Range province. The building concrete foundation echoes the river theme with its cross-bedded pattern low on the external walls on the north and west sides. 

Many vital functions take place on the first floor with its sample preparation laboratories, field equipment storage, computing facilities, and department collections.

First Floor West Entrance

First floor west entrance.

A window display of matched "bookends" of translucent honey-banded travertine transmits the western light.

A window display of matched “bookends” of translucent
honey-banded travertine transmits the western light.

The parking structure façade of the Basin and Range design.

The parking structure façade of the Basin and Range design.


FIRST FLOOR DISPLAYS & SLABS

First floor map


TIME CAPSULE BENCH

First floor view



During demolition of the old Mines Building, historic portions were saved and are now displayed on the first floor. Items include three large terracotta “pick and hammer” medallions that graced the exterior of the Mines Building, a time capsule sandstone bench that incorporates Batchelder arts and crafts tiles from the interior of the Mines Building and its original cornerstone that contains photographs and mining-related memorabilia. In 2009 an additional time capsule incorporated into the sandstone bench in the first floor lobby.

Mines Building cornerstone in new time capsule sandstone bench donated by State Stone.

Mines Building cornerstone in new time capsule sandstone bench donated by State Stone.

Custom 1927 Mines Building terracotta medallions.

Custom 1927 Mines Building terracotta medallions.


RIO TINTO EARTHQUAKE INFORMATION CENTER

Seismograph Stations office

The Rio Tinto Earthquake Information Center, made possible by a generous gift from Utah Kennecott Copper, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto, is the state-of-the-art home of University of Utah’s Seismograph Stations (UUSS)—now located in an earthquake-resistant facility with backup power. Earthquakes have been recorded at the University of Utah for more than 100 years. UUSS, formally established in 1966, is a group of faculty, staff, and students involved in seismic monitoring of the Utah region and the Yellowstone National Park region (quake.utah.edu). Data from more than 300 regional and urban seismic stations are continuously transmitted to the UUSS network center where they are automatically processed as part of a real-time earthquake information system, operating since 2002 as part of the Advanced National Seismic System. The Center advances earthquake science, awareness, and public safety. It provides visualization tools and electronic displays that help the public service and educational missions of the Center and UUSS in interactions with public school students, news media, and the general public. 


STUDENT EPICENTER

The Student Epicenter, the College of Mines and Earth Science’s (CMES) academic advising center, opened in 2018 and is accessible from the first floor lobby and FASB west entrance. The Epicenter helps students get involved with and connected to resources they need to succeed and, ultimately, make an impact on the world. Among other services, the Epicenter provides academic advising, scholarship postings, information on CMES clubs and student professional chapters, open study sessions, and help with resumes, interviewing skills, and applying for graduate school. 

Student Epicenter
Students in Student Epicenter


DEPARTMENT CURATION & COLLECTIONS FACILITY

Several rooms, including the Quintin Sahratian Sample Preparation Laboratory, contain the Department’s extensive collections and equipment for preparing rocks and minerals for scientific analysis. Display cases line the hallway, showcasing many of the Department’s rare specimens. 

Rock Display


UTAH ROOM

The Utah Room features unique specimens that were all found in localities around the state of Utah. This includes a large collection of trilobites, other fossils, rocks, minerals, and gems. 



Utah Room

Other first floor spaces include: 

  • SPATIAL Laboratory: Conducts Hydrogen and Oxygen isotopic analysis using Cavity Ringdown spectroscopy. 
  • GeoHazards Laboratory: Concept testing and calibration of instrumentation used to asses geologic hazards such as landslides and arch stability 
  • Thinsection Laboratory: Preparation and polishing of geologic samples used in petrographic and chemical studies. 

FIRST FLOOR ROCK SLABS

The following slabs are located on the first floor (including two that are on the south and west exterior walls); refer to first floor displays & slabs.

 

#3: Onice Honey Travertine: Creamed Colored Travertine Stone Curtains, Banded Limestone, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Iran

#3: Onice Honey Travertine: Creamed Colored Travertine Stone Curtains, Banded Limestone, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Iran 

#5: Verde Fuoco: Multi-Colored, Fluid-Altered Igneous Intrusion and Migmatite; Wallaroo, Australia

#5: Verde Fuoco: Multi-Colored, Fluid-Altered Igneous Intrusion and Migmatite; Wallaroo, Australia 

 

#7: Purple Dunes: Garnet Biotite Gneiss, Metamorphic; Brazil

#7: Purple Dunes: Garnet Biotite Gneiss, Metamorphic; Brazil 

#9: Mezzanotte: Folded & Metamorphosed Carbonates and Mudstones, Metamorphic; Brazil

#9: Mezzanotte: Folded & Metamorphosed Carbonates and Mudstones, Metamorphic; Brazil 

#10: Volcano Classic: Granitic Rock Intermingled with Partially Melted Metamorphic Rock, Contact Metamorphism; Brazil

#10: Volcano Classic: Granitic Rock Intermingled with Partially Melted Metamorphic Rock, Contact Metamorphism; Brazil 


SECOND FLOOR

Second Floor View

Exploring beyond the Confluence, the second floor features a collection of seismology and geology cartoons by long-time cartoonist for The Salt Lake Tribune, Pat Bagley, and many named spaces honoring various generous donors. Within each of these space there is a short write-up about its namesake.

  • David A. & Hanne Duke Gathering Area: West-end informal meeting space.
  • Francis H. Brown Classroom: For instruction in Earth science courses.
  • Gerald W. Hohmann Electromagnetic Laboratory: Dedicated to fundamental and applied studies in electromagnetic geophysics.
  • Grant Parsons Computer Lab: Used for instruction and provides access to high performance computing to students of geology and geophysics.
  • Jerry Knaus Gathering Area: North-end informal meeting space.
  • Michael & Margaret Kerr Seismic Imaging/Tomography Laboratory: For research into applied seismic techniques.
  • Reverend Marta Sutton Weeks-Wulf Lecture Hall: 80-seat lecture hall.
  • Vivien Jameson Conference Room: Conference room within the College of Mines and Earth Science (CMES) administrative office.
Fish Painting
Earthquake Painting
Dinosaur Painting

Painting of Mt.Moran

Painting of Mt. Moran, Grand Teton National Park, by Karl Thompson. This painting hangs in the Dean’s Office reception area. It was donated by Terrence and Andrea Chatwin. 

Dean's Office Fossil Collage

A large, unusual collage of fossils also hangs in the Dean’s Office reception area. It was donated by Dr. Lonnie and Shannon Paulos. 

The map of second floor displays and rock slabs is second floor displays & slabs.


GLOBAL CHANGE & SUSTAINABILITY CENTER

The Global Change and Sustainability Center (GCSC) coordinates, promotes, and accelerates interdisciplinary research and training on natural and human-built systems, the dynamic interactions and interconnections that exist in those systems, and the role of humans in the environment. 

GCSC

SECOND FLOOR ROCK SLABS

Many of the second floor’s perimeter hallway rock slabs exhibit a variety of igneous to metamorphic compositions and structures that represent the solid Earth. The following slabs are located on the second floor; refer to second floor displays & slabs.

#16a: Marinace Slabs: Red Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#16a: Marinace Slabs: Red Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#16b: Marinace Slabs: Black Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#16b: Marinace Slabs: Black Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#16c: Marinace Slabs: Green Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#16c: Marinace Slabs: Green Conglomerate, Sedimentary; Brazil

#18: Fish Wall: Green River Formation, Terrestial Sedimentary; Utah

#18: Fish Wall: Green River Formation, Terrestial Sedimentary; Utah

#21: Red Dragon: Fluid-Altered Granite, Intrusive Igneous; Brazil

#21: Red Dragon: Fluid-Altered Granite, Intrusive Igneous; Brazil

#22a: Green/Brown Rainforest: Details of Fracturing and Fluid Alteration of Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous; India

#22a: Green/Brown Rainforest: Details of Fracturing and Fluid Alteration of Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous; India

#22b: Green/Brown Rainforest: Details of Fracturing and Fluid Alteration of Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous; India

#22b: Green/Brown Rainforest: Details of Fracturing and Fluid Alteration of Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous; India

#23: Victoria Regia: Fluid Altered “Serpentinized” Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous: Brazil

#23: Victoria Regia: Fluid Altered “Serpentinized” Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous: Brazil

#24: White Pegmatite: Very Coarsely Crystalline Igneous Rock; Unknown Origin

#24: White Pegmatite: Very Coarsely Crystalline Igneous Rock; Unknown Origin

#25: Juparana: Granite, Fractured Igneous Intrusion; Brazil

#25: Juparana: Granite, Fractured Igneous Intrusion; Brazil 

#26: White Maccabus: Deformed Marble, Metamorphic; Brazil

#23: Victoria Regia: Fluid Altered “Serpentinized” Pillow Lava, Extrusive Igneous: Brazil

#27: Underformed Marble Tiles: Layered Marble, Metamorphic; Unknown Origin

#27: Underformed Marble Tiles: Layered Marble, Metamorphic; Unknown Origin 

#29: Sandstones (clockwise from top): Mud Ripples, Animal Tracks, Trace Fossils, and Kanab Wonderstone; Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah

#29: Sandstones (clockwise from top): Mud Ripples, Animal Tracks, Trace Fossils, and Kanab Wonderstone; Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah 

#30: Wasabi: Columnar Joints and Fluid Alteration, Extrusive Igneous; Brazil

#30: Wasabi: Columnar Joints and Fluid Alteration, Extrusive Igneous; Brazil 

#31: River White: Feldspar and Quartz- Rich Mylonitized Granite with Garnet, Metamorphic; India

#31: River White: Feldspar and Quartz- Rich Mylonitized Granite with Garnet, Metamorphic; India 

#32: Azul del Mar: Boudinage: Stetching of Strong Layers and Flow of Weaker Layers, Metamorphic; Brazil

#32: Azul del Mar: Boudinage: Stetching of Strong Layers and Flow of Weaker Layers, Metamorphic; Brazil 

#33: Snowflake Porphyry: Large Crystal Clusters of Plagioclase Feldspar in an Andesite Groundmass, Extrusive Igneous; Brazil

#33: Snowflake Porphyry: Large Crystal Clusters of Plagioclase Feldspar in an Andesite Groundmass, Extrusive Igneous; Brazil 

#34: Smeralda: Fractured and Fluid- Altered Granite in a Fault Damage Zone; Nicaragua

#34: Smeralda: Fractured and Fluid- Altered Granite in a Fault Damage Zone; Nicaragua 

#36: Bahia Blue: Sodium and Potassium- Rich, Quartz-Poor ‘Granite’ (Sodalite Syenite), Intrusive Igneous; Brazil

#36: Bahia Blue: Sodium and Potassium-Rich, Quartz-Poor ‘Granite’ (Sodalite Syenite), Intrusive Igneous; Brazil 


THIRD FLOOR

Third Floor View

The third floor houses the administrative offices for the Department of Geology and Geophysics, classrooms, faculty offices, and analytical laboratories. 

Named spaces include:

  • Charles R. & Cathy Williamson Sedimentary Laboratory: Dedicated to the study of sedimentary rocks and basin analysis.
  • Ferdinand F. & Henrietta J. Hintze Paleontology & Sedimentology Teaching Laboratory: For instruction about rocks, fossils, and geologic history.
  • Grant Parsons Classroom: For instruction in Earth science courses.
  • Hellmut H. & Gerda S. Doelling Gathering Area: North-end informal meeting space.
  • Matthew P. Nackowski Ore Petrology Laboratory: To investigate ore minerals and their genesis.
  • Robert & Jan Smith Computational Lab: Used for instruction and provides access to high performance computing to students of geology and geophysics.
  • William Lee & Betty Curtis Stokes Paleontology Laboratory: For study of fossils of all kinds.
  • Waldemar E. & Harriet R. Rasmussen Conference Room: For faculty meetings and other conferences.
  • Electron Microprobe Laboratory: Quantitative chemical analysis of minerals and other solid materials using electron microprobe, X-ray spectrometry.
  • QEMSCAN/X-Ray Powder Diffraction Laboratory: Mineral identification using X-ray diffraction and electron miscroscopy.
Students in lab

THIRD FLOOR DISPLAYS & SLABS

Floor 3 Map


THE HAROLD R. BURTON FOUNDATION ROOF GARDEN


This green roof showcases the benefits of alternative roof design including:

Increased energy efficiency: Reduces energy required to maintain indoor temperature by regulating roof surface temperatures and reflecting light from green landscapes.

Reduction of the urban heat island effect: In Utah’s hot summer season, the green roof will help remove heat from the air through evapotranspiration, reducing the temperature of the roof surface and the surrounding air.

Roof Garden

 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY & GEOPHYSICS ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

The Department’s administrative office is located in room 383. The office also houses the beautiful and rare artifacts shown. 


Fossil palm frond (Palmites), Eocene Green River Formation, southwest Wyoming. A gift ofLonnie Paulos, M.D. 

The coffee table is made of a colorful karst breccia from Europe.

Geology & Geophysics Administrative Office

 

METEORITE DISPLAY


“Out-of-this-world” meteorites are on display in the Department of Geology and Geophysics administrative office, including the Beaver-Harrison Meteorite, found by John E. Welsh in Beaver County, Utah. It is an olivine-hypersthene chondrite stony meteorite, weighing 925 grams. It was gifted by Janet Welsh. 

 

Meteorites


 

THIRD FLOOR ROCK SLABS

Earth history (e.g., sedimentary geology, structural geology, and resources) is exemplified in the many sedimentary rock slabs of Proterozoic to Cenozoic in age. The following slabs are located on the third floor; refer to third floor displays & slabs.

#37: Trace Fossils and Physical Sedimentary Structures: Marine Sedimentary; Idaho and Utah

#37: Trace Fossils and Physical Sedimentary Structures: Marine Sedimentary; Idaho and Utah

#38: Sedimentary Structures: Ripples and Mud Cracks, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah

#38: Sedimentary Structures: Ripples and Mud Cracks, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah

#40: Cephalopods: Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Utah

#40: Cephalopods: Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Utah

#39: Wood Grain Silver: Muddy Laminated Limestone, Calcareous Lake/Inland Sea Sediments, Terrestrial Sedimentary; China

#39: Wood Grain Silver: Muddy Laminated Limestone, Calcareous Lake/Inland Sea Sediments, Terrestrial Sedimentary; China 

#41: Eocene Fish Mass Mortality: Green River Formation, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah

#41: Eocene Fish Mass Mortality: Green River Formation, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Utah 

#42: Fossil Etrusco: Cephalopod Limestone, Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Morocco

#42: Fossil Etrusco: Cephalopod Limestone, Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Morocco 

#45: Fossil Black: Cephalopod Limestone, Belemnite Graveyard, Marine Sedimentary; Morocco

#45: Fossil Black: Cephalopod Limestone, Belemnite Graveyard, Marine Sedimentary; Morocco 

#47: Iron Red: Banded Iron Formation, Marine Sedimentary; Brazil

#47: Iron Red: Banded Iron Formation, Marine Sedimentary; Brazil 

#48: Meteor Shower/ Cygnus: Deformed Diamictite, Meta- Sedimentary; Brazil

#48: Meteor Shower/ Cygnus: Deformed Diamictite, Meta- Sedimentary; Brazil 

#49: Copacobana: Granitic Dikes Intermingled with Partially Melted Metamorphic Rock, Contact Metamorphism; Brazil

#49: Copacobana: Granitic Dikes Intermingled with Partially Melted Metamorphic Rock, Contact Metamorphism; Brazil 

#50: Cephalopods: Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Utah

#50: Cephalopods: Ammonites, Marine Sedimentary; Utah 

#51: Caspian Seashell: Nummulitic Limestone (Giant Amoeboid Protists called Foraminifera), Marine Sedimentary; Turkey

#51: Caspian Seashell: Nummulitic Limestone (Giant Amoeboid Protists called Foraminifera), Marine Sedimentary; Turkey 


FOURTH FLOOR

Fourth Floor View

Faculty offices and geochemical and geological engineering laboratories are located on the fourth floor. 

Named spaces include:

  • Donald D. & Erika A. Runnells Aquatic Chemistry Laboratory: For the study of aqueous geochemistry.
  • Donald D. & Erika A. Runnels Gathering Area: West-end informal meeting space. 
  • G.W. Anderson Structural Modeling/Deformation Laboratory: For study of rock deformation and the formation of geologic structures.
  • James A. Whelan Gathering Area: (A gift from Mike and Andrea Manship) north-end informal meeting space.
  • MagMaX Lab (Magma & Mantle Experimental Laboratory): For the study of magma genesis and of the transport and differentiation from the mantle to the crust.
  • Dissolved & Noble Gas Lab: Analytical mass spectrometry for the purpose of dating young groundwaters using noble gas thermometry and age dating. 
  • ICP MS Metals Lab: Analytical mass spectrometry of trace metals and heavy isotopes minerals, water, and tissue.
  • Particle Light Scattering Size & Surface Charge Lab: Analysis of particle size distribution in fluids.
  • Strontium Isotope Geochemistry Lab: Analysis of strontium isotopes using analytical mass spectrometry.
  • Stable Isotope Lab: Analysis of stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes.

FASB is full of beautiful geologically-themed maps, photos, and works of art.

FASB is full of beautiful geologically-themed maps, photos, and works of art. 

Many labs are located on the fourth floor, including the Dissolved and Noble Gas Laboratory.

Many labs are located on the fourth floor, including the Dissolved and Noble Gas Laboratory


FOURTH FLOOR DISPLAYS & SLABS

Fourth Floor Map


PAT & JUDY BEATIE PETRIFIED WOOD COLLECTION

Parts of this collection are displayed on the first and fourth floors. The Beaties spent decades collecting these specimens; some may represent new species. 

PAT & JUDY BEATIE PETRIFIED WOOD COLLECTION

FOURTH FLOOR ROCK SLABS

Earth surface studies include hydrology, geochemistry, volcanology, and geological engineering, housed on the fourth floor. Rock slabs reflect water processes, their precipitates, and complex geochemical conditions. The following slabs are located on the fourth floor; refer to fourth floor displays & slabs. 

#52: Meteorus: Garnet Staurolite Schist, Metamorphic; Brazil

#52: Meteorus: Garnet Staurolite Schist, Metamorphic; Brazil 

#53: Red Travertine: Brecciated Limestone Karst, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Italy

#53: Red Travertine: Brecciated Limestone Karst, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Italy 

#54: Green Onyx: Undeformed Green Travertine Limestone, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Pakistan

#54: Green Onyx: Undeformed Green Travertine Limestone, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Pakistan 

#55: Sandulus: Sorted and Layered Sandstone, Diamictite, Sedimentary; Brazil

#55: Sandulus: Sorted and Layered Sandstone, Diamictite, Sedimentary; Brazil 

#56: Meteorus: Garnet Staurolite Schist, Metamorphic; Brazil

#56: Meteorus: Garnet Staurolite Schist, Metamorphic; Brazil 

#58: Gris Marquina: Fractured and Grey Marble, Metamorphosed Carbonate Breccia; Iran

#54: Green Onyx: Undeformed Green Travertine Limestone, Terrestrial Sedimentary; Pakistan 

#59: Pietra Grey: Fractured Grey Marble, Metamorphosed Carbonate Breccia; Iran

#59: Pietra Grey: Fractured Grey Marble, Metamorphosed Carbonate Breccia; Iran 

#60: Migmatite: Coarsely-Crystalline Igneous Rock with Large Iron & Magnesium- Rich Aluminium Silicate Minerals (Cordierite: Blue), Intrusive Igneous; Brazil

#60: Migmatite: Coarsely-Crystalline Igneous Rock with Large Iron & Magnesium-Rich Aluminium Silicate Minerals (Cordierite: Blue), Intrusive Igneous; Brazil 

#61: Volga Blue: Labradorite Anorthosite, Calcium-Rich Intrusive Igneous Rock; Ukraine

#61: Volga Blue: Labradorite Anorthosite, Calcium-Rich Intrusive Igneous Rock; Ukraine 


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

We are grateful to our major benefactor, Reverend Marta Sutton Weeks-Wulf, and the many other individuals and organizations whose gifts made this building possible. We thank the many companies who provided in-kind gifts that greatly enhance the furnishings, displays, and special projects incorporated into this facility. We give special recognition to Department of Geology and Geophysics faculty members, including former dean, Frank Brown, who dedicated tremendous time and thought into making this building a special place for future generations of students, teachers, and researchers to learn about Earth science. Thank you all!

If we neglected to mention any major donor, we sincerely apologize.

FASB at night
North Fascade
Last Updated: 6/3/22